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TPL Insights: Building Peak-Performance Cultures #101 – Nine Things Successful People Do Differently

January 6, 2022

By  

Rob Andrews

With paraphrased content from Heidi Grant’s HBR article “Nine Things Successful People Do Differently”

Why have you been so successful in reaching some goals, but not others? If you aren’t sure, you are not alone. Research shows that even brilliant, highly accomplished people are lousy when it comes to understanding why they succeed or fail at specific endeavors. The intuitive supposition — that you are born predisposed to certain talents and lacking in others is often wrong. In fact, decades of research on achievement suggests that successful people reach their goals not simply because of who they are, but more often because of the decisions they make and what they do as a result of those decisions.

  1. Get SpecificWhen you set a goal, be specific. “Lose 5 pounds” is a better goal than “lose some weight,” because it gives you a clear idea of what success looks like. Knowing exactly what you want to achieve keeps you motivated until you get there. Also, think about the specific actions that need to be taken to reach your goal. Just promising you’ll “eat less” or “sleep more” is too vague — be clear and precise. “I’ll be in bed by 10pm on weeknights” leaves no room for ambiguity.
  2. Do It Now. Given how busy most of us are, and how many goals we are juggling at once, it’s not surprising that we routinely miss opportunities to act on a goal because we simply fail to notice them. Did you really have no time to work out today? No chance at any point to return that phone call? Achieving your goal means grabbing a hold of these opportunities before they slip through your fingers.
    To seize the moment, decide when and where you will take each action you want to take, in advance. Again, be as specific as possible (e.g., “If it’s Monday, Wednesday, or Friday, I’ll work out for 30 minutes before work.”) Studies show that this kind of planning will help your brain to detect and seize the opportunity when it arises, increasing your chances of success by roughly 300%.
  3. Keep Track. Achieving any goal also requires honest and regular monitoring of your progress — if not by others, then by you yourself. If you don’t know how well you are doing, you can’t adjust your behavior or your strategies accordingly. Check your progress by keeping a list of all your goals and reviewing them weekly. A weekly checklist gives you a sense of accomplishment.
  4. Get Ready. When setting a goal, engage in lots of positive thinking about how likely you are to achieve it. Believing in your ability to succeed is enormously helpful for creating and sustaining your motivation. But whatever you do, don’t underestimate how difficult it will be to reach your goal. Most goals worth achieving require time, planning, effort, and persistence. Studies show that thinking things will come to you easily and effortlessly leaves you ill-prepared for the journey.
  5. Get Better. Believing you have the ability to reach your goals is important, but so is believing you can acquire the ability. Many of us believe that our intelligence, our personality, and our physical aptitudes are fixed — that no matter what we do, we won’t improve. As a result, we focus on goals that are all about proving ourselves, rather than developing and acquiring new skills.
    Fortunately, decades of research suggest that the belief in fixed ability is completely wrong — abilities of all kinds are profoundly malleable. Embracing the fact that you can change will allow you to make better choices and reach your fullest potential. People whose goals are about getting better rather than being good, take difficulty in stride, and appreciate the journey as much as the destination.
  6. Have Grit. Grit is a willingness to commit to long-term goals, and to persist in the face of difficulty. Studies show that gritty people obtain more education, earn higher college GPAs, earn more money, and lead happier more productive lives. Grit predicts which cadets will stick out their first grueling year at West Point. In fact, grit even predicts which round contestants will make it to at the Scripps National Spelling Bee. Grit is what often separates good from great and the mediocre from the magnificent.
    The good news is, if you aren’t particularly gritty now, there is something you can do about it. People who lack grit often believe that they just don’t have the innate abilities successful people have. If that describes your own thinking …. well, there’s no way to put this nicely: you are wrong. Effort, planning, persistence, and good strategies are what it really takes to succeed. Embracing this knowledge will not only help you see yourself and your goals more accurately, but also do wonders for your grit.
  7. Build Willpower Muscle. Your self-control “muscle” is just like the other muscles in your body — when it doesn’t get much exercise, it becomes weaker over time. But when you give it regular workouts by putting it to good use, it will grow stronger and stronger, and better able to help you successfully reach your goals.
    To build willpower, take on a challenge that requires you to do something you’d honestly rather not do. Give up high-fat snacks, do 100 sit-ups a day, stand up straight when you catch yourself slouching, try to learn a new skill. When you find yourself wanting to give in, give up, or just not bother — don’t. Start with just one activity and plan for how you will deal with troubles when they occur. It will be hard in the beginning, but it will get easier, and that’s the whole point. As your strength grows, you can take on more challenges and step-up your self-control workout.
  8. Don’t Tempt Fate. No matter how strong your willpower muscle becomes, it’s important to always respect the fact that it is limited, and if you overtax it, you will temporarily run out of steam. Don’t try to take on two challenging tasks at once if you can help it (like quitting smoking and dieting at the same time). And don’t put yourself in harm’s way — many people are overly-confident in their ability to resist temptation, and as a result they put themselves in situations where temptations abound. Successful people know not to make reaching a goal harder than it already is.
  9. Focus on The Positive. Do you want to successfully lose weight, quit smoking, or put a lid on your bad temper? Then plan how you will replace bad habits with good ones, rather than focusing only on the bad habits themselves. Research on thought suppression (e.g., “Don’t think about white bears!”) has shown that trying to avoid a thought makes it even more active in your mind. The same holds true when it comes to behavior — by trying not to engage in a bad habit, our habits get strengthened rather than broken.

Grant says: It is my hope that, after reading about the nine things successful people do differently, you have gained some insight into all the things you have been doing right all along. Even more important, I hope that you can identify the mistakes that have derailed you and use that knowledge to your advantage from now on. Remember, you don’t need to become a different person to become a more successful one. It’s never what you are, but what you do.

At Allen Austin, our executive search, interim and leadership practices view the world through the lens of TPL, our leadership architecture engineered to build cultures of peak performance. We are in relentless pursuit of content that will help our stakeholders transform themselves into leaders worth following, who lead organizations with high performance mindsets, unified leadership, disciplined human capital practices and measurement systems that fully engage purpose, customers, employees, and community. For more related content, feel free to access our resource center at allenaustin.com.

Warmest Regards,
Rob

Rob Andrews
Allen Austin
Consultants in Retained Search & Leadership Advisory

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