Industrial & Manufacturing

Industrial & Manufacturing

Executive Search & Leadership Advisory

According to the National Academics of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, about one-third of the energy used in the United States in 2015 went to industry. That’s understandable in view of the wide range of activity in this economic sector. Every product on which we rely—from gasoline and automobiles to food, buildings, machinery, and appliances—takes energy to produce. The use of energy in industry affects every single citizen directly through the cost of goods and services, the quality of manufactured products, the strength of the economy, and the availability of jobs.

The use of energy in industry affects every single citizen directly through the cost of goods and services, the quality of manufactured products, the strength of the economy, and the availability of jobs.

The industrial sector uses energy in many ways. One major application involves raising the temperature of components in the manufacturing process, which is called process heating. Refining crude oil, where heat is used to separate various distillates, is an example of this. Another common use of energy in industry is to heat a boiler that generates steam or hot water.

A few industries use a very large share of energy in the industrial sector. Petroleum refining is the principal consumer, with the chemical industry a close second. Those users, plus the paper and metal industries, account for 78% of total industrial energy use.

Industry and manufacturing rely heavily on natural gas  (30% of all energy consumed by the industrial sector in 2015), petroleum  and other liquids (26%), and electricity (10%), with coalrenewables, and biofuels  making up the rest.

Industrial energy needs are projected to grow by 31% during the next 25 years, when they will account for about 38% of total U.S. consumption. Part of this increase may occur because some manufacturing activities formerly located overseas are returning to the United States, in response to a recent trend toward lower natural gas prices prompted by increases in domestic production.

As a leading retained executive search firm, Allen Austin is uniquely positioned to fulfill the talent needs of Industry and Manufacturing for the Energy sector. Utilizing our deep industry knowledge and our extensive experience, we assist companies to find the best executive-level talent.  We can devise a tailored strategy to attract, develop, and retain the best leaders who can drive a business’s long-term success.

Our ability to deliver superior-quality results to every client lies in our deep understanding of global industry trends. We use this knowledge to help our clients identify and exploit opportunities by anticipating and fulfilling their talent needs in a proactive manner.

Allen Austin has been known by many energy companies as the best retained search firm in Houston and the U.S, and, since 2014, the best leadership advisory firm in Houston and the U.S.

Allen Austin was voted as one of: 1. Forbes best executive recruiting firms 2. Energy Magazine best energy executive search firms 3. CEO Journal best executive search firms 4. Top Executive Search Firms 5. Y Scouts best executive search firms in Houston 6. Expertise Magazine best business and leadership consultants in Houston

Search engagements: Cheif Executive Officer (16%) Chief Operating Officer (14%) Chief Financial Officer (15%) Cheif Information Officer (11%) Chief Revenue Officer (3%) Chief Human Resources Officer (3%) Chief Legal Officer (5%) Chief Marketing Officers (7%) SVP and VP Level Officers 13%, Director and Manager Levels (13%)

Leadership Advisory Engagements: Strategy & Implementation (8%) Unified Leadership (19%), Board Services (13%) Leadership Development and Communications (18%) Culture Shaping (8%) Disciplined Hiring Practices (13%) Stakeholder Engagement (8%) Customer Experience (7%) Measuring what Matters (7%) Cost Leadership (3%) Harnessing Purpose (6%)